Internet acting funny in your home? Find out what's wrong

We’re tied to our devices most days in both our personal lives and work. Because of our reliance on technology, a wrench is thrown in our day if our internet goes down. Lots of folks maybe know vaguely where the “box” is for their internet in their home, but they don’t understand much about it other than there are blinking lights.

If your Netflix / Hulu / Amazon prime / Spotify or other streaming services aren’t working right, there are a few steps you can take. First - check the Wi-Fi strength on your device. Is it full? Can you move closer?



Second thing you can do is a speed test. I like using https://www.speedtest.net/ or I use Speedcheck from the Android app store. A simple search in your app store for a speed test app will help you find one - be sure to check out the ones with high reviews.

If you find that your internet is not giving you the download and upload speeds you pay for, check out https://downdetector.com/ - it’s a huge database of services and if they are experiencing any hiccups. This is a great way to find out if your internet provider is having known issues. If they aren’t, you could be first or you may benefit from a simple reboot of your modem. This can be very helpful and resolve many issues - just like restarting your computer or phone. Be sure to do a search for the steps on how to reboot your device on Google, in your device’s manual, or your provider’s website.

What about just a single website? I use https://downforeveryoneorjustme.com/ which is great for checking out services like Facebook or YouTube.

These are pretty simple steps, though they should help most folks do basic troubleshooting. If you’re finding that your devices given to you by your internet provider aren’t up to the challenge, I’ve personally had great experiences using Google’s Wifi that creates a mesh network.

Google created these wireless routers that send a strong signal throughout your home. Depending on how large your home is (and any structures that would cause the signal to weaken) determines how many you need. A simple 600 sqft 1-bedroom apartment would only need one, whereas a 1300 sqft 2-bedroom townhouse may need at least 2-3. When you disable your wifi from your internet provider’s device (sounds scarier than it is, I found guides using Google searches) and use Google’s device instead, it’s smart and even lets you prioritize a device for a set amount of time. It also comes with an app for your phone. I’ve been using it with great success, though there are certainly others you can use, too.

Good luck!